What is

Emotional

Intelligence?

 

 

It’s hard to believe that when Peter Salovey of Yale University first described Emotional Intelligence in 1991, in partnership with John Mayer, it was the first systematic scientific acknowledgment of what most humans understand intuitively: that our ability to manage emotions - ours and those of people around us - is essential to our success and happiness.

 

Emotional intelligence encompasses a set of skills that allow you to put your emotions to work. Central to EI is the ability to recognize your emotions and the emotions of others, and to be able to describe and discriminate amongst them. Emotionally intelligent individuals have the skills to manage their emotions and express them in a constructive way.

 

Since the beginning, Yale has been at the forefront of research into EI and - most importantly - its application in the real world. In his role as Director of the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence, our co-founder, Marc Brackett, has published over 100 papers on EI, while developing RULER, which has trained over 1 million students in EI.

 

Why EI

Matters

Emotions

Drive

Personal

Performance

High EI employees work better on teams and across the organization.  They earn higher ratings from managers and peers (and get more promotions and better compensation).

 

Emotionally intelligent employees understand their emotions and adjust, translating to better individual performance and improved collaboration.

 

Emotions

Drive

Team

Performance

Research has shown that teams with higher EI have higher retention rates and receive better ratings from managers.

 

When a team improves its emotional intelligence, collaboration improves while interpersonal friction declines.

 

Great

Leaders,

High

EI

Emotionally intelligent leaders drive better results and build teams with deeper commitment.

 

Leaders that understand their own feelings and those of their teammates’ create a climate that supports excellence.